Care, Loss and the End of Life

loss-1-ebook2

Care, Loss and the End of Life

£7.95

Edited by Nate Hinerman and Mary Ruth Sanders

Format: eBook (PDF)

Year: 2016

This volume thoughtfully engages responses to grief and loss using a variety of methodologies, including case studies, fieldwork, systematic philosophy, theology, as well as historical and textual analysis.

Want to see more? You can now download the Introduction.

Download Free Sample
148 mm x 210 mm
164
978-1-84888-487-8

This inter- and multi-disciplinary volume examines various experiences of loss, whether we encounter it in the form of lost loved ones, lost relationships, lost opportunities or the loss of capabilities as we age. Loss is something we can experience personally, as part of a family, and as part of a community whose collective experiences of loss occasions more public displays of commemoration. We are constantly challenged to find ways of coping and surviving in the face of different types of loss. Due in part to the complexities of the concept itself and the resistance many individuals feel toward discussing painful subjects, it is often difficult to engage in the sort of robust, inter-disciplinary dialogue that is needed to explore fully the links between living, suffering, dying, and surviving loss. Thus, this volume is profoundly interdisciplinary, as it explores how loss can be expressed through cognitive, affective, somatic, behavioral/interpersonal, and spiritual grief responses.

Introduction 
Nate Hinerman and Mary Ruth Sanders

Part I Looking Back

Peering over a Cliff Edge: Legal Decision and Ethical Issues in Ian McEwan’s The Children Act (2014)
Luísa Maria Flora

Cemeteries in Jakarta: Corpse Treatment and Management
Raditya Hari Murti

Surviving the ‘Dark Night’ with the ‘Rising of the Sun’: When the Monarch Dies
N. Zeynep Yelçe

Part II Looking Forward

The Rebirth of Death: Representation of Loss in Television Series
Mattia Cinquegrani

Overcoming Loss in the Context of Dark Tourism: Inspiration in Kierkegaard’s Writings
Katarína Gabašová

The Effectiveness of Camp Oz in Children’s Grief Process
Eunhye Choi and Sarah K. Sifers

The Future of Living (and Dying) in the U.S.: What Roles will Hospice and Palliative Care Play
Nate Hinerman

Think Ahead: An Irish Advance Planning Tool
Sarah Murphy

The Ethics of POLST
Lloyd Steffen

Part III Historical, Social and Cultural Pressures

What Remains: The Middle English Disputation Between the Body and the Worms and the Late Medieval Experience of Death
Martin Blum

Theological Narratives of Loss in Response to Terrorism
Mary Ruth Sanders

Making Peace with Grief through Indigenous Wisdom
Tomofumi Oka

Traditions in Transition: Practices Related to Stillbirth in a Multicultural Society
Ellen Kristvik

Nate Hinerman is Dean of Undergraduate Programs at Golden Gate University, and is on the faculty at the University of San Francisco. He also Chairs the San Francisco Bay Area End of Life Coalition, now in its 17th year. As an MFT, he also maintains a psychotherapy practice, helping clients transition amidst loss. Contact nphinerman@usfca.edu

Mary Ruth Sanders is a Lecturer in History at Armstrong State University in Savannah, Georgia. Her research focuses on Christian responses to terrorism, and she is currently working on her first book project. Contact Mary Sanders mary.sanders@armstrong.edu