Interactive Convergence: Critical Issues in Multimedia

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Interactive Convergence: Critical Issues in Multimedia

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Edited by Scott Schaffer and Melissa Price

Year: 2005

Format: eBook

 

The models and frameworks used to guide multimedia design thinking are rooted in relatively obsolete communications and software design approaches. The emergence of dynamic, networked web-centric environments has created new opportunities for theory-building and has opened new avenues of research into long-standing questions about the effect of multimedia on learning. This volume is reflective of these concepts.

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210 x 297 mm
277
978-1-904710-09-7

This book was inspired by a desire to discover methods and models for doing research related to multimedia design, development and evaluation. Such research is inherently multi-disciplinary and inherently messy. The use of multimedia to visually represent knowledge, information, and processes, and to support computer-based and networked environments is now standard practice. The models and frameworks used to guide multimedia design thinking are rooted in relatively obsolete communications and software design approaches. The emergence of dynamic, networked web-centric environments has created new opportunities for theory-building and has opened new avenues of research into long-standing questions about the effect of multimedia on learning. Unfortunately, empirical evidence describing best practices and models for applying multimedia in various settings is relatively scant. It was for this reason that the first Interactive Convergence conference was conceived.

The conference, held in Prague during the summer of 2003, was devoted to dialogue about multimedia research across a wide variety of disciplines. Papers were presented by a diverse group of individuals representing more than 10 countries and many forms of multimedia research. Subjects covered were impressive in their range from theorybuilding and conceptualizing to controlled studies examining multimedia effects, and almost everything in between! Much of the focus of this collection is on teaching and learning in school settings since these learning environments offer excellent opportunities to do research related to practice. Some chapters also focus on the design of multimedia environments and offer models for improving or radically altering the design process.

Preface

Interactive Media Education in the U.S. and the U.K.
Tim Hudson and Kavita Hayton

The Difficulty in Communicating with Computers
Bertil Ekdahl and Lise Jensen

Accounting for User Needs and Motivations in Game Design
Lucy A. Joyner and Jim TerKeurst

Spatial Context of Interactivity
Stanislav Roudavski and François Penz

Interactive Multimedia = Whatever Intermedia
Julainne Sumich

Mixed-mode Communication Courses at a Multicultural Technikon
Dee Pratt

Construction, Consumption and Creation – The Convergence of Medium and Tool
Anders Kluge

Multi-disciplinary, Cross-cultural Community Building in University Multimedia Design Environments
Scott P. Schaffer and Melissa Lee Price

Is Electronic Community an Addictive Substance? An Ethnographic Offering from the EverQuest Community
Florence Chee and Richard Smith

When Identity Play Became Hooking Up: Cybersex, Online Dating and the Political Logic of Infection
Jeremy Kaye

Advising Student Software Development Teams for Maximum Performance
Randy S. Weinberg and Jennifer A. Tomal

Use of Interactive Multimedia to Improve the Lecturing Experience
Clive Chandler

Learning with Interactive Media: Characteristics of its Impact in Three Different Environments
Corine Fitzpatrick and Michael Mucciardi

Learning Language through Video Games: A Theoretical Framework, An Evaluation of Game Genres and Questions for Future Research
Jonathan deHaan

A Community Without a Vision Will Not Work
Bettina Dimai and Martin Ebner

No Sense of Cyberplace: Personal Jurisdiction in Internet Litigation
Lindsley Armstrong Smith

Scott P. Schaffer is Associate Professor at the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, Purdue University, USA. Scott’s primary interest is learning and performance in the workplace and other informal settings, including virtual and public settings. He is particularly interested how technology tools support building knowledge through individual and team problem solving and collaboration.

Melissa Lee Price is Professor of New Media in the Faculty of Arts, Media and Design at Staffordshire University in the United Kingdom. She heads the MA in Interactive Multimedia as well as the MFA in European Interactive Multimedia, a joint Master’s program offered in consortium with six European institutions of higher learning and endorsed by the European Academy of Digital Media. Her research focuses on computer mediated communication and distance learning.