Looking at Ourselves: Multiculturalism, Conflict & Belonging

9781848880160

Looking at Ourselves: Multiculturalism, Conflict & Belonging

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Edited by Katherine Wilson

Year: 2010

Format: eBook

 

The congress, held from Friday, 25 September to Monday, 28 September 2009 at Mansfield College, Oxford, brought together delegates from 19 countries representing numerous academic disciplines. As our papers reflected our various practices of writing within our disciplines, from sociology and literary studies to film documentary and social work, we found the need to learn how to speak to each other again.

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978-1-84888-016-0

If there is a silver lining, we certainly found it. Despite an amazing response from scholars across the world, due to a number of unforeseen circumstances, a portion of the delegates at the 3rd Global Conference on Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging had to regretfully withdraw their participation at the conference. This unfortunate event, however, became the catalyst for the remaining scholars to reorganise into a plenary meeting, making the occasion both intimate and intense.

The congress, held from Friday, 25 September to Monday, 28 September 2009 at Mansfield College, Oxford, brought together delegates from 19 countries representing numerous academic disciplines. As our papers reflected our various practices of writing within our disciplines, from sociology and literary studies to film documentary and social work, we found the need to learn how to speak to each other again. Thus, the ‘close quarters’ of this year’s conference succeeded in enhancing our consciousness of interdisciplinarity. During the four days we were together, we seemed to enact the three themes which had brought us together: we experimented with our own multicultural space (if academic disciplines can be thought of as cultures); experienced conflict in reconciling the words we used with the expertise of others, and ultimately, found that our diligence in striving for mutual understanding had fostered a sense of belonging amongst us.

Our experience also directly correlated with the overall rationale of the At the Interface project, under which all Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging conferences fall. At the Interface research project aims at expressing the idea that ‘learning and reflection is best conducted through an interactive process which engages in mutual and reciprocal dialogue’. In this way, the project endeavours to ‘take people beyond the horizons of what they usually encounter’.

Looking at Ourselves:: An Introduction
Katherine Wilson

SECTION I: Multiculturalism and Its Discontents

Representation Strategies of Cultural Diversity in Three European Capitals of Culture
Tuuli Lähdesmäki

Reification in the Census? Multiculturalist Policies and Identity Markers in 36 Democracies
Caroline Duvieusart-Déry

Friday Re-educated: Orientalising the Eastern European Other in Rose Tremain’s The Road Home
Józef Jaskulski

Parochialism – Revitalisation – Development: How to Build the Economic and Cultural Environment by Changing the Local Space
Dariusz Waldzinski and Eliza Chodkowska

SECTION II: Rethinking Conflict

Adding Culture: Multicultural Problem Solving in Water Conflicts
Boyd W. Fuller

Dirt: A Social Mirror
Meghna Haldar

The Invention of Gesture in the Lack of Words
Tina Rahimy

Imitating Art or Life: The Tragic Hero’s Emergence on France’s Postcolonial Stage
Stephanie-Alice Baker

Analysing Generalised Trust in Heterogeneous Communities using Social Representations
Olimpia Mosteanu

Addressing the Legacy of Violence within the Youth Agenda in Northern Ireland: Practical Strategies and Methods of Working with Young People within a Society Coming to Terms with the Past and the Future
Barry Fennell and Laura Stewart

SECTION III: The Politics of Belonging

Being an African: Some Queer Remarks from the Margins
Paul Prinsloo

Recognition as Negotiation
Giorgio Bertolotti

The Dominican Second Generation: Creation of a Subalternate Identity
Julia Meszaros

Fragmented Lives, Fragmented Identities: An Exploratory Study of the Effect of Out-and In-Marriage on the Identities of Filipinos in the United Kingdom
Ramona Buhain Bacon

An Identity Matrixing Model for Transculturality
Michael Kearney and Setsuko Adachi

Inside the Caves of Moon Palace: Being the Self Becoming the Other
Joana Lima

Self: Hand Me Down Clothes
Charlene April Clempson

Divide, Diverge and Conquer within Context: An Investigation into the Evolution and Synthesis of Female Fashion and Social Representation in the Arabian Gulf
Stephanie Ryan Cate and Annemarie Profanter

The Space of Salsa: Theory and Implications of a Global Dance Phenomenon
Katherine Wilson

Katherine Wilson is currently pursuing her PhD in English Modern Studies at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. Her most recent research involves post-atrocity narratives of Cambodia and East Timor—two places where she has also taught Salsa.