No Escape: Excavating the Multidimensional Phenomenon of Fear

fht9coversplash

No Escape: Excavating the Multidimensional Phenomenon of Fear

£7.95

This interdisciplinary collection challenges and destabilises salient iterations and conceptualizations of fear, enabling conversations to emerge that situate, contextualise and challenge the ways in which representations of fear are embedded within patterns of daily life.

Want to see more? You can now download the Introduction.

Download Free Sample
148 mm x 210 mm
100
978-1-84888-429-8

This collection seeks to invite a new approach to understanding the phenomenon of fear. By looking at the multidimensionality of fear within various sites – political, literary and historical  – this work invites us to approach the myriad ways articulations of fear can be animated. The chapters of this book permit us to look at fear at its origins and in its various embodiments as a globalised phenomenon that is immanent within a multitude of disciplines. By taking up an interdisciplinary lens, this collection effectively challenges and destabilises salient iterations and conceptualizations of fear, enabling conversations to emerge that situate, contextualise and challenge the ways in which representations of fear are embedded within patterns of daily life.

Between the Ruins, Only Fear Shines Through 
Dean Caivano

Criminality, Pathology and the Urban Gothic: Fin de Siècle London and Gotham City
Erica McCrystal

The Day When the Rural and the Urban Worlds Had to Struggle: Mother’s Day
Erika Tiburcio Moreno

A Fear of the Dark: Landscape as a Gothic Monster in HBO’s True Detective (2014)
Rachel Franks

The Representation of Marginalized Groups in Different Brazilian Medias
Virgínia Laís Souza

Fear as Currency in Political Actions: Vaccines, Hope and Despair
Kate Brannum and Joseph H. Campos II

Death Fears in Students of Medical, Social and Engineering Disciplines
Ksenia Chistopolskaya, Sergey Enikolopov, Sofia Chubina,
and Sergey Ozol

Gender, Horror and Terror Case Study: Women as Mass Murderers
Lily Halpert Zamir

Fear of ‘Brown Men’ after 9/11: H. M. Naqvi’s Home Boy and Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist
Gen’ichiro Itakura

The Symbiotic Relationship of the American Megastate and Post-9/11 Terrorism: Politics of Fear, Violence and Dependency
Dean Caivano

Dean Caivano is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Political Science at York University in Toronto, Canada. His research focuses on radical democracy, early American political thought and emancipatory politics.