The Role of the Monster: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil

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The Role of the Monster: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil

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Edited by Niall Scott

Year: 2009

Format: eBook

 

The role of the monster in myths, literature, culture, and the political and social realm is a worthy subject of academic study because of its ability to penetrate and transform. This eBook takes a closer look at monsters and monstrosities.

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210 x 297 mm
249
978-1-904710-28-8

The monster as metaphor presents and represents the unspeakable and takes us beyond what our imagination may permit, almost into the unimaginable realm. The role of the monster in myths, literature, culture, and the political and social realm is a worthy subject of academic study because of its ability to penetrate and transform. Susan Leigh Starr says of Monsters and Metaphors in the context of power, that: “metaphors may heal or create, erase or violate, impose a voice or embody more than one voice.” She also comments that metaphors have a function to bridge worlds. The combination of metaphors, monsters and bridging different worlds are an highly appropriate way to describe the third Global conference on Monsters and the Monstrous’, held in the Neoclassical surroundings of the Hotel Gellert on the banks of the Danube in Budapest in May 2005.

Introduction
Niall Scott

PART I   Literary Monsters
The Mark Of A Monster:  Limits of Knowledgeand Edge of the Human in Dialogue With the Unheard -Of
Nane Cantatore

Monstrous Nature: Moby Dick as Monster Between Myth and Modernity
Roberta Fornari

Nobody’s Meat: freedom Through Monstrosity in Contemporary British Fiction
Ben Barootes

Behind the Mask of the Metaphor: The Unintentional Monster in a Graphic Text
Phil Fitzsimmons

When Charisma Breeds A Monster: Dangerous Liaisons in Carmel Bird’s Mandala Trilogy
Gerardo Rodriguez Salas and Margarita Carretero Gonzalez

Responses to the Uncanny
Christopher Auld

PART II   Political Monsters
Do You Believe in Monsters? Superstition and Fear in a Chiloé Community – Southern Chile
Giovanna Bacchiddu

Werewolves on the Baltic Seashore. The Monstrous Frontier of Early Modern Europe, 1550-1700
Stefan Donecker

Dracula as Ethnic Conflict: Representing US Humanitarianism in the Former Yugoslavia
Neda Atanasoski

Family, Race and Citizenship in Disney’s Lilo and Stitch
Emily Cheng

Feeding Frenzy? Media Sharks Monster Jaws
Wendy Bilboe

PART III   Media Monsters
Monstrous Mothers and the Media
Nicola Goc

The Monster Under the Bed: Adult Anxieties of Childhood
Lois Drawmer

The Enemy Within: The Child As Terrorist in the Contemporary American Horror Film
Colette Balmain

Gods and Monsters
Nina Ohligschlaeger

‘It’s Morning in America:’ The Rhetoric Of Religion in the Music of the Lost Boys,and the deserved Death of the 1980’s Vampire
Sorcha Ní Fhlainn

‘God Hates Us All:’ Kant Radical Evil and the Monstrous Human in Heavy Metal
Niall Scott

Monster Mash: Pioneers of the Gothic Elements in Rock and Roll
Pete Remington

PART IV      Miscellaneous Monsters
Monsters and History
J. Randall Groves

The Renaissance of The Bearded Woman: An Examination of Ribera’s Problematic Portrait of Magdalena Ventura
Richard Tilbury

Zoocentrically About Bestial Porno and Erotic Zoophilia
Suzana Marjanić

Of Monsters, Masturbators and Markets: Autoerotic Desire, Sexual Exchange and the Cinematic Serial Killer
Greg Tuck

Rational, Magical or Monstrous Spaces? Press Responses to London’s Main Drainage System, 1865-68
Paul Dobraszczyk

Cute Monster/Monstrous Cute. Some notes on the transformative power of Cuteness
Maja Brzozowska

Niall Scott, University of Central Lancashire.